It doesn't get any more local than your own home


Weatherstrip your door utilizing a rubber door sweep.

As an urbanite living in an apt. most appropriately described as "livable" in regards to its size, most of Tedeschi's article on weatherproofing a house does not apply to me. A house with an attic and basement? --I'll pass. However, Tedeschi provides a couple valuable weatherproofing tips that too applies to an urbanites apt.:



If your doorway lacks adjustable thresholds, install a rubber door sweep (about $7 at Home Depot).
Weatherstripping, is also a must, for doors and windows. Mr. Gfeller prefers stripping of various thicknesses (the labels say whether they’re designed for doorways or windows); Frost King’s cost about $4 to $7 a package. Mr. David prefers V-shaped stripping (about $4 from Frost King); this type, he said, breaks down less easily than foam.

Thanks for the tips, Pragmatist. This would be the first step in retrofitting my apt. However, because my radiator is at full blast 24-7, as its thermometer is based on the temperature of the entire building, the light drafts that seep through my single window are my main source of ventilation in my 3rd floor walk-up. Due to these circumstances, weatherstripping my apartment is not an option. But I now find there's is a bigger issue to tackle: individual thermostats for each apartment in the building. My building (6 floors high) does not have an elevator-- I imagine talking to the landlord about individual thermometers will be quite entertaining, to him mostly. --Will be sure to post about this as it comes up.


Back to this NYT article though. The core message? Be proactive. If something smells fishy, like your absurdly high utility bill, it can probably be assuaged. I would also suggest innovativeness. All for the sake of lowering his utility bill and better understanding his living, breathing home, Tedeschi called the board member of the Residential Energy Services Network, a lead technician for New England Conservation Services, and a senior vice president at Lowe’s. Perhaps he was prompted to seek out home retrofitting aficionados for the sake of his article, but whatever the motivation, we're now benefiting from his legwork.


Cheers

Comments

  1. So you did part A, but what about

    B) My personal commentary
    C) The core values of the topic that one should digest

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey, here you go:

    B) As an urbanite living in an apt. most appropriately described as "livable" in regards to its size, most of Tedeschi's article on weatherproofing a house does not apply to me. A house with an attic and basement? --I'll pass. However, Tedeschi provides a couple valuable weatherproofing tips that too applies to an urbanites apt.:

    Thanks for the tips, Pragmatist. This would be the first step in retrofitting my apt. However, because my radiator is at full blast 24-7, as its thermometer is based on the temperature of the entire building, the light drafts that seep through my single window are my main source of ventilation in my 3rd floor walk-up. Due to these circumstances, weatherstripping my apartment is not an option. But I now find there's is a bigger issue to tackle: individual thermostats for each apartment in the building. My building (6 floors high) does not have an elevator-- I imagine talking to the landlord about individual thermometers will be quite entertaining, to him mostly. --Will be sure to post about this as it comes up.

    C) The core message? Be proactive. If something smells fishy, like your absurdly high utility bill, it can probably be assuaged. I would also suggest innovativeness. All for the sake of lowering his utility bill and better understanding his living, breathing home, Tedeschi called the board member of the Residential Energy Services Network, a lead technician for New England Conservation Services, and a senior vice president at Lowe’s. Perhaps he was prompted to seek out home retrofitting aficionados for the sake of his article, but whatever the motivation, we're now benefiting from his legwork.

    ReplyDelete

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